Addressing the Unique Needs of Men and Women in Noncommunicable Disease Services

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Each year, more than 36 million people die due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). In 2008, NCDs accounted for approximately 60% of total global deaths (WHO 2013). NCDs include stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, chronic respiratory illness, diabetes, common mental illnesses, substance abuse and the consequences of violence. Almost 80% of deaths from NCDs now occur in lower- to middle-income countries(WHO 2011), making NCDs the leading cause of premature death and disability. In fact, disease burden related to NCDs is now higher than the combined mortality due to infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, in all regions except Sub-Saharan Africa.

Different gender-related issues affect NCD programming and need to be taken into account when designing, implementing and evaluating NCD intervention strategies and services. If left unaddressed, these issues can undermine program effectiveness and individual patient outcomes.

Addressing the Unique Needs of Men and Women in Noncommunicable Disease Services
Addressing the Unique Needs of Men and Women in Noncommunicable Disease Services
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English