Special Issue of International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) Journal Released

Led by the URC-led, USAID-funded Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems (ASSIST) Project, the journal supplement represents the collective thinking of more than 60 leading authorities from 22 countries in quality improvement and research

In the field of healthcare quality improvement, two key questions are: “Are the results attributable to the reforms that were implemented?” and “Are these changes generalizable?” Answering these questions is particularly challenging because healthcare is complex and the interventions tend to be dynamic and multi-dimensional.

The recently released special supplement of articles – written and edited in part by URC staff – and published by the International Journal for Quality in Health Care, reflects the insights and learnings gleaned from a gathering of improvement and research leaders in July 2016 in Salzburg, Austria. The event, entitled the “Salzburg Global Seminar Session 565 — Better Health Care: How do we learn about improvement?” was convened to think through the best ways to learn about improvement and address questions of attribution, generalizability, and rigor.

A key conclusion reached by the meeting participants is the need for a closer relationship between evaluation and implementation. Attendees even held a mock “wedding” ceremony at the end of the event to symbolize the need for this important connection.

Participants included nine URC staff members, including representatives from the ASSIST Project, which is improving the quality and outcomes of health care and other services by enabling host country providers and managers to apply the science of improvement.

“We at URC are continually pushing to advance knowledge in health care quality improvement, create best practices based on this research, and effectively apply these practices in local contexts,” said URC Senior Vice President M. Rashad Massoud, who served as chair for the gathering. “Ultimately, the goal is to improve the delivery of quality healthcare services for improved health outcomes.”

Read more about the ASSIST project.

 

M. Rashad Massoud (center), URC Senior Vice President, served as chair for meeting of more than 60 experts to discuss the best ways to learn about improvement and address questions of attribution, generalizability, and rigor.
M. Rashad Massoud (center), URC Senior Vice President, served as chair for a meeting of more than 60 experts to discuss the best ways to learn about improvement and address attribution, generalizability, and rigor. (Credit: Salzburg Global Seminar)
Date 
April 27, 2018
Regions/ Countries