Tuberculosis South Africa Project (TBSAP)

Overview

The Tuberculosis South Africa Project (TBSAP) provides technical assistance to the Government of South Africa to reduce the burden of tuberculosis and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in the country.

TBSAP builds upon interventions and achievements from URC’s USAID TB CARE II South Africa and the prior TB South Africa Project.

TB CARE II activities are supporting the South Africa National Department of Health’s TB prevention and control efforts, working closely with national and provincial partners to close identified gap areas and further develop sustainable systems that can carry forward long-term improvements in TB and drug-resistant TB diagnosis, care, and treatment services.

 

Objectives

  • Reduce TB infections
  • Increase the sustainability of effective TB response systems
  • Improve care and treatment of vulnerable populations

 

Achievements

  • Reducing test turnaround time: TBSAP supports a variety of detection, testing, and treatment improvements, including reducing the overall turnaround time from sputum collection to treatment in hospital settings from 4.3 days to one day in 2018 in 14 hospitals in Gauteng Province. This success is due in part to implementation of the FAST approach.
  • Creating a mobile health app to support TB testing and treatment: TBSAP developed and uses the ConnecTB mobile health application for recording and reporting patient data during directly observed treatment support visits to TB and MDR-TB patients. The app was launched in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Health District in June 2015. Within nine months of initiation, loss to follow-up rates in supported areas were much lower than rates in the greater Mandela Bay District area.

 

Resources

 

“Buddy,” the We Beat TB mascot, cheers up children during the campaign’s launch at the Brooklyn Chest Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Credit: USAID | Southern Africa
“Buddy,” the We Beat TB mascot, cheers up children during the campaign’s launch at the Brooklyn Chest Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Credit: USAID | Southern Africa
Duration
2016 to present
Funders 
US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Regions/ Countries