Driving Down Malaria Mortality in 10 High-Burden Facilities in The Northern Region

File Type: PDF | File Size: 232.85 KB

Malaria is a leading cause of mortality and outpatient visits in Ghana. When the USAID Systems for Health project began in 2014, malaria prevalence among children (6–59 months) in Ghana was estimated at 27 percent, and 40 percent of all outpatient visits presented as malaria with fever.

The Northern Region experienced a disproportionate burden, accounting for one-third of malaria deaths in Ghana in 2015. The region’s malaria case fatality rate for children under the age of five years also was 60 percent higher than the national average. Most of these deaths happened at 10 district hospitals, so Systems for Health targeted interventions to these facilities, including:

  • Emergency Triage, Assessment, and Treatment (ETAT);
  • Onsite coaching and post-training follow-up;
  • Shared learning; and
  • Region-wide interventions, including training for more than 3,000 health workers.

Total annual malaria deaths decreased in the 10 targeted facilities from 414 in 2015 to 87 in 2017, a decline of by 79 percent.

 

A graph showing the decline in malaria deaths, from 2015–2017, among all ages in the 10 targeted facilities.
A graph showing the decline in malaria deaths, from 2015–2017, among all ages in the 10 targeted facilities.
Publication Date 
June 2018
Resource Type 
Success Stories
Regions/ Countries 
Language 
English